A journey with your loved one's cancer is sometimes long . . . often short, but the time with our animal companions is never enough. We hope that by sharing our resources with you, we can help make your climb up the mountain even a little bit easier, and perhaps give you more precious moments to hug your pet, instead of pouring through books, staring at a computer screen, and banging on every door, looking for anything and everything to help your beloved companion.

**FAVOURITE PRINT RESOURCES FOR CANCER PREVENTION AND TREATMENT**

Optimal Nutrition, Raw and Cooked Canine Diets: The Next Level by Monica Segal AHCW, Foreword by Ana Hill DVM, PhD

This book discusses feeding of the stud dog, breeding bitch before and after whelping, new puppies, young pups in their permanent homes, working dogs and those with different lifestyles, and senior dogs. Also, explanations and diet samples (raw and cooked) for heart disease, kidney disease, urinary tract stones, liver disease, hypothyroidism, pancreatitis, Cushing’s Syndrome, Addison’s Disease, allergies, gastrointestinal diseases, skin problems and an interview with Dr. Greg Ogilvie (famous for the “cancer diet”) about cancer. Includes the National Research Council (NRC) 2006 recommended allowances (for adult dogs) on an “as fed” basis and provides new analyses of some raw meaty bones (chicken quarters, chicken carcass, lamb shank, lamb rib, pork rib, turkey wing and turkey thigh).

www.monicasegal.com


"Speaking for Spot"
Speaking for Spot was a labor of love for Dr. Nancy Kay, fueled by her passion to teach people how to be effective medical advocates for their four-legged best friends. Gone are the days of simply following doc’s orders-today’s dog lovers are confronted with health-care decision-making on many levels. Dr. Kay is the recipient of the 2009 Hill's Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award.


http://www.speakingforspot.com/
h).

www.monicasegal.com

A Veterinary Materia Medica "Veterinary Materia Medica";  George Macleod
Bach Flower Remedies for Animals "Bach Flower Remedies for Animals";  Helen Graham and Gregory Vlamis

Cancer Therapy: The Independent Consumer's Guide to Non-Toxic Treatment and Prevention "Cancer Therapy: The Independent Consumer's Guide to Non-Toxic Treatment and Prevention";  (includes:  Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs, Diets, Immune Boosters, Less Toxic Drugs, Ways to Reduce Side Effects of Chemotherapy, Research from Around the World, Resources to Help You Make Choices, etc); Ralph W. Moss, PhD

Dogs: Homoeopathic Remedies "Dogs: Homoeopathic Remedies";  George Macleod

For Every Dog An Angel "For Every Dog An Angel";  Christine Davis

Four Paws, Five Directions: A Guide to Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs "Four Paws, Five Directions: A Guide to Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs";  Cheryl Schwartz, DVM

Healing with Chinese Herbs "Healing with Chinese Herbs";  Lesley Tierra

Herbal Medicine, Healing & Cancer: A Comprehensive Program for Prevention and Treatment "Herbal Medicine, Healing & Cancer: A Comprehensive Program for Prevention and Treatment";  Donald R. Yance

Herbs Against Cancer "Herbs Against Cancer";  Ralph W. Moss, PhD

The Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog "The Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog";  Wendy Volhard and Kerry L. Brown

Homeopathic Care for Cats & Dogs: Small Doses for Small Animals "Homeopathic Care for Cats & Dogs: Small Doses for Small Animals";  Don Hamilton, DVM

IP6, Nature's Revolutionary Cancer-Fighter "IP6, Nature's Revolutionary Cancer-Fighter";  Abulkalam M. Shamsuddin, MD, PhD

Pets Living with Cancer: A Pet Owner's Resource "Pets Living with Cancer:  A Pet Owner's Resource";  Robin Downing, DVM

Shiitake, The Healing Mushroom "Shiitake, The Healing Mushroom";  Kenneth Jones

The Complete Herbal Handbook for the Dog and Cat "The Complete Herbal Handbook for the Dog and Cat"; Juliet De Bairacli Levy

The Nature of Animal Healing: The Path to Your Pet's Health, Happiness, and Longevity "The Nature of Animal Healing: The Path to Your Pet's Health, Happiness, and Longevity"; Martin Goldstein, DVM

The Veterinarians' Guide to Natural Remedies for Dogs: Safe and Effective Alternative Treatments and Healing Techniques from the Nations Top Holistic Veterinarians "The Veterinarians' Guide to Natural Remedies for Dogs: Safe and Effective Alternative Treatments and Healing Techniques from the Nations Top Holistic Veterinarians"; Martin Zucker
Includes:

  • Natural Diet Plus Supplements:  Roger De Haan, DVM
  • Antioxidants Plus Chinese Herbs:  Nancy Scanlan, DVM
  • Homeopathy, Herbs, and Supplements:  Charles Loops, DVM
  • Multiple Supplement Programme:  Tejinder Sodhi, DVM
  • Whole-Food Supplements:  Joseph Demers, DVM
  • Pau d'Arco Plus Vitamin C:  Maria Glinski, DVM
  • Extending Life Naturally:  Thomas Van Cise, DVM
  • Essiac Tea:  Nina Aloro, DVM and Michele Yasson, DVM

Why is Cancer Killing Our Pets?: How You Can Protect and Treat Your Animal Companion "Why is Cancer Killing Our Pets?: How You Can Protect and Treat Your Animal Companion"; Deborah Straw, Gary Kowalski.
Includes:
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Herbs
  • Diets
  • Immune Boosters
  • Research from Around the World

Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs & Cats "Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs & Cats"; Richard H. Pitcairn, Susan Hubble Pitcairn

Earl Mindell's Nutrition & Health for Dogs: Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy with Natural Preventative Care and Remedies "Earl Mindell's Nutrition & Health for Dogs: Keep Your Dog Healthy and Happy with Natural Preventative Care and Remedies"; Earl Mindell

Home-Prepared Dog & Cat Diets: A Healthful Alternative "Home-Prepared Dog & Cat Diets: A Healthful Alternative"; Donald R. Strombeck

Keep Your Dog Healthy the Natural Way "Keep Your Dog Healthy the Natural Way"; Pat Lazarus

Includes:

  • Completely Natural Preventive Care
  • Healing Diets for Optimal Health
  • Holistic Alternatives for Serious Conditions
  • Acupuncture, Homeopathy, Herbs, and Nutritional Supplements

Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats "Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats"; C. J. Puotinen

Prescription for Herbal Healing: A Practical A-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Herbs and Herbal Preparationsy "Prescription for Herbal Healing: A Practical A-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Herbs and Herbal Preparations"; Phyllis A. Balch

Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats: The Ultimate Pet Diet "Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats: The Ultimate Pet Diet"; Kymythy R. Schultze

Natural Healing for Dogs and Cats A-Z "Natural Healing for Dogs and Cats A-Z"; Cheryl Schwartz

Dogs: The Ultimate Care Guide: Good Health, Loving Care, Maximum Longevity "Dogs: The Ultimate Care Guide: Good Health, Loving Care, Maximum Longevity"; Matthew Hoffman

Holistic Aromatherapy for Animals: A Comprehensive Guide to the Use of Essential Oils and Hydrosols with Animals "Holistic Aromatherapy for Animals: A Comprehensive Guide to the Use of Essential Oils and Hydrosols with Animals"; Kristen Leigh Bell

Medical Aromatherapy: Healing with Essential Oils "Medical Aromatherapy: Healing with Essential Oils"; Kurt Schnaubelt

Veterinary Aromatherapy "Veterinary Aromatherapy"; Nelly Grosjean


Dog Heaven "Dog Heaven"; Cynthia Rylant

Dog Heaven "Jasper's Day"; Marjorie Blain Parker, Janet Wilson

I'll Always Love You "I'll Always Love You"; Hans Wilhelm

Goodbye, Friend: Healing Wisdom for Anyone Who Has Ever Lost a Pet "Goodbye, Friend: Healing Wisdom for Anyone Who Has Ever Lost a Pet"; Gary Kowalski

Manual of Natural Veterinary Medicine: Science and Tradition "Manual of Natural Veterinary Medicine: Science and Tradition"; Susan G. Wynn, Steve Marsden

Published in the fall of 2004, this book is a "must read" for those facing the cancer challenge, with their beloved dog.

Dr. Allen M. Schoen, author of "Kindred Spirits: How the Remarkable Bond Between Humans and Animals Can Change the Way We Live," writes, "This book is filled with great wisdom and support for all animal lovers dealing with the diagnosis of cancer in their canine friend. Read it and recognize all that you can do to help support your dog. This book will be of great benefit to animal caretakers and their kindred spirits!"

Terry Winkelman, for "Dog Fancy" magazine, writes, "Gentle, accessible, and full of hope, Kaplan's book offers an understandable overview of cancer pathology and treatment. With contributions from 10 different veterinary experts, the text covers supplements, diets, chemotherapy, and both traditional and holistic approaches. Anyone in the unfortunate position to need  this information will benefit greatly from her reporter's skill at research, her editor's gift for making tough material readable, and her personal experience..."

http://www.HelpYourDogFightCancer.com/HowToOrder.html
.

The Healthy Pet Manual: A Guide to the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

The Healthy Pet Manual
A Guide to the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer Deborah Straw

by Gary Kowalski (Foreword), Deborah Straw (Author)

Keeping animal companions healthy and happy is the number one priority of pet owners. Having lost four animals to cancer, author Deborah Straw became frustrated by the lack of information about what was causing the disease and wanted to know what she could do to treat and prevent it. This thorough and comprehensive guide is the result of her search for answers. It provides readers with the knowledge of how to ward off the unforeseen causes of cancer and protect the safety and health of their pets.


 

 

Special Contest for Young Cancer Bridge Kids

Inspired by the September 2002 publication of Jasper's Day, a wonderfully poignant new children's book, about euthanasia and loss, written by Marjorie Blain Parker, and illustrated by Canadian artist, Janet Wilson, The Land of Pure Gold (www.landofpuregold.com), held a very special contest for Young Cancer Bridge Kids.

While Jasper, the Golden depicted in Marjorie's book, succumbed to cancer at a senior age, there are many young Goldens, like my beautiful Blues, who are being diagnosed with cancer, at a very young age. 'Marjorie Blain Parker's tender story, is filled with smiles, tears, and the joy of special memories. Janet Wilson's gentle pastels, capture the depth of love, shared by a boy and his dog. Together, they speak of acceptance, remembrance, and the importance of cherishing life's every moment.' (from the inside cover of Jasper's Day).

If you would like to see the winners of this very special contest, please visit
http://landofpuregold.com/jasper.htm

To purchase your own copy of Marjorie Blain Parker's Jasper's Day from Amazon.ca, please click here


"Veterinary Cancer Therapy Handbook: Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgical Oncology for the Practicing Veterinarian"; Barbara Kitchell, Susan M. Larue, Robert Rooks

"Reishi Mushroom: Herb of Spiritual Potency and Medical Wonder";  Terry Willard, and Christopher Hobbs

"The Whole Dog Journal:  A Monthly Guide to Natural Dog Care and Training"; Subscription Services:  1-800-829-9165;  wholedogjl@palmcoastd.com
October 1998:  Dogs and Cancer;  There are almost as many types of cancer afflicting our dogs as there are breeds.  What are the risks for your dog, and what can you do to reduce them?
November 1998:  The Latest Cancer Treatments:  WDJ looks at the newest approaches -- conventional and alternative -- to defeating canine cancer.
December 1998:  Eating Right to Fight Cancer;  Experts describe the components of a diet that can help defeat the disease, as well as a diet that can help prevent cancer in the first place.
August 2000:  Our Answer to Cancer;  A WDJ reader shares an amazing story about her dog's apparent remission from cancer, thanks to two additions to her diet.

"A Review of Herbal Cancer Therapy" (includes:  Fats and Oils, Supplements, Herbal Therapies for Cancer, Essiac, Hoxsey Therapy, Cat's Claw, Medicinal Mushrooms, Lymphoma and Diet, Cancer and the Lymph System, etc);
Prepared for Jean's Greens Herbal Tea Works and Herbal Essentials, by C. J. Puotinen

"Cancer:  The Essential Guide to Natural Pet Care for Dogs and Cats"; Cal Orey

"Homeopathic Medicine for Dogs: A Handbook for Vets and Pet Owners";  H.G. Wolff, MVSC

"Maitake, King of Mushrooms:  The Amazing Broad-Range Healing Powers of an Ancient Food and Remedy";  Shari Lieberman, PhD and Ken Babal, CN

Dr. Kidd's Guide to Herbal Dog Care;  Randy Kidd, DVM, Ph.D.
Nutritional and supplemental support, including information about the use of ESSIAC and the Hoxsey Formula.

Maitake King of Mushrooms;  Shari Lieberman, Ph.D., and Ken Babal, C.N.


"K9 Kitchen . . . Your Dog's Diet: The Truth Behind the Hype";  Monica Segal AHCW
Published by Doggie Diner Inc., 2002;  Available at www.doggiediets.com

Monica Segal received her certification in Animal Health Care from the University of Guelph. She continues to study in the areas of animal nutrition, physiology, parasitology, and disease. Monica's articles on canine nutrition, have appeared in several publications, and she is frequently interviewed on radio and television stations. Monica has formulated customized canine diets for clients throughout North America, Europe, and Australia. She enjoys working closely with veterinarians, offering assistance in solving diet related health issues. She hosts the internet discussion group K9 Kitchen, and conducts seminars and workshops, by invitation. Monica lives in Toronto, Ontario, with her husband Morley, and their canine companions, Zoey and Cassie.


Lymphoma

by

Jeff Grognet, DVM, BSc (Agr)

Lymphoma, also known as lymphosarcoma, is an all too common form of cancer in our canine companions. Because it originates from cells of the lymphoid system (the cells that fight infections), it quietly spreads throughout the body. Not until these cancerous cells have penetrated every corner of the body does it cause symptoms. Now, the subtle attack by the cancer leads to a raging battle for survival.

The annual incidence of canine lymphoma is reported as high as 30 cases for every 100,000 dogs. Most veterinarians diagnose this cancer in at least one dog every year. Lymphoma typically strikes middle-aged dogs between five and ten years of age and is particularly prevalent in Boxers, Golden Retrievers, Saint Bernards, Scottish Terriers, Airedales, and Bulldogs.

The triggers for lymphoma are unknown. Some specialists theorize that a retrovirus is to blame. Retroviruses are a proven cause of lymphoma in cats and cattle so it isn't hard to imagine that a variant exists in dogs but it has yet to be found.

A few researchers have implicated 2,4-D as a causative agent in canine lymphoma. One study showed a two-fold increase in the incidence of lymphoma in dogs that lived on property where owners applied the herbicide 2,4-D to their lawns for four or more consecutive years. As in people afflicted with this cancer, electromagnetic forces, such as those generated by high voltage power lines, also might be a trigger for lymphoma.

The most apparent symptom of lymphoma in dogs is swollen lymph nodes. The easiest "nodes" to feel are below the ears and in the crease behind the knee. Though these nodes can be enormous, most dogs are not ill when the enlargement is first noticed. As the disease progresses, the dog acts ill – his appetite falls off and he loses weight.

In some dogs, the lymph nodes that can be felt on the outside of the body remain a normal size, while cancer cells flourish in the lymph nodes inside the body. If the intestinal nodes (and intestines) are involved, the affected dog will usually vomit and/or have diarrhea. When the nodes around a dog's lungs are invaded with cancer cells, the dog may have difficulty breathing or he may cough.

The easiest way to confirm the presence of cancerous cells in a lymph node is to insert a needle into a swollen gland, aspirate a few cells, and spread them on a microscope slide for viewing. This procedure is called a fine needle aspirate. Alternatively, an enlarged lymph node can be surgically removed then sent to a veterinary pathologist for analysis. Lymphoma in the chest or abdomen is more difficult to diagnose. Radiographic and ultrasound imaging can be used to identify the presence of abnormal masses but a biopsy is needed to make an accurate diagnosis.

Once a diagnosis of lymphoma is made, owners need to decide whether or not to begin chemotherapy. Without treatment, a dog with lymphoma lives (on average) a short four to six weeks following diagnosis. Though chemotherapy is rarely curative, it does offer most dogs a good chance for remission and a good quality of life.

The simplest and most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent is prednisone. When given at high doses, it is toxic to tumour cells and it also stimulates the patient's appetite. Overall, treated dogs feel better – they are more active and have a better attitude. Prednisone therapy alone offers significant short-term control of the symptoms of lymphoma but it is only effective for one or two months. Eventually, dogs on prednisone start to lose weight and feel lethargic. Prednisone is also a one-way street. If an owner chooses to initiate intensive chemotherapy after prednisone has already been started, the outcome will be less favourable than if the other drugs were given at the time that prednisone was first administered.

Veterinary oncologists (veterinarians who specialize in cancer) have studied canine lymphoma extensively and have devised many chemotherapeutic protocols. The best remission rates are obtained when several drugs are given together. A multi-drug regime utilizing vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, L-asparaginase, and prednisone offers complete remission in 85 percent of dogs and a median survival time of about 12 months. Eventually, the cancer starts growing again and the lymph nodes will swell with tumour cells, but with this protocol, one in five dogs live longer than two years.

Chemotherapy drugs are given initially at high doses in an attempt to achieve remission. The frequency and dose is then lowered to a maintenance schedule that keeps the cancer in check. Chemotherapy is a frightening word for many dog owners because they know about its horrific side effects in people. In dogs, chemotherapy drugs for lymphoma are used at much lower doses than in people so canine patients feel good throughout their treatment.

 

copyright 2004, Jeff Grognet ©

Jeff Grognet is a veterinarian practicing in Qualicum Beach, BC, Canada. He utilizes both traditional and alternative therapies (acupuncture and VOM). Jeff has written extensively for publication. He also teaches two courses on the Internet - Becoming a Veterinary Assistant and Canine Reproduction. These can be found at www.ed2go.com by clicking on "Course Catalog" and "Health Care, Nutrition, and Fitness".

Author must be contacted for reprinting the article.

 

Healthy Paws Initiative

Background and Purpose 
 
The City of Toronto is among the more than 60 municipalities that have a pesticide by-law to limit the cosmetic (non-essential) use of residential pesticides. Homeowners, tenants, businesses and lawn care companies must comply with the by-law. A critical step to ensuring compliance with pesticide by-laws is to educate residents on how to solve their pest problems without using the banned pesticides. 

To reach those living in suburban areas of Toronto who have a lawn or garden, the Healthy Paws Initiative created by the Canadian Centre for Pollution Prevention www.c2p2online.com targets suburban pet owners, particularly those with dogs. In the City of Toronto, more than 60,000 dogs use more than 1,000 dog parks. Outdoor pets are vulnerable to lawn chemicals since they breathe closer to the ground, lick their paws and coat, and are more likely to roll around in, crawl on, or even eat the grass that’s been treated with pesticides. They are also vulnerable due to their small size. Pet owners can also be exposed to pesticides when they handle their pets. 

Documents on Pesticide Exposure and Dogs 

The two page Fact Sheet compiled by the group Pesticide Free Yards in Calgary provides information about what to do if your pet is exposed to pesticides. Also included are lots of natural gardening tips. Their website www.pesticidefreeyards.org provides even more information about Pesticide Free Yards. 

This eight page article called Dogs and Pesticide Use from the Alabama Cooperative Extension System reports on a wide variety of pesticides and their impacts on animals. Pest control methods that do not involve pesticides are also provided. 

An academic article titled Herbicide exposure and the risk of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in Scottish Terriers was published in the Journal of American Veterinary Medicine Association on April 15, 2004. The findings suggest that exposure to lawns and gardens treated with herbicides is associated with an increased risk of cancer in Scottish Terriers. The full article can be viewed here. 

Objectives and Targets 

With the help of volunteers, a minimum of 500 dog owners will be reached through the Healthy Paws initiative. Over a four day period at four different parks around the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) dog owners will be provided with information and incentives to encourage reducing or eliminating pesticide use on residential gardens and lawns. 

Don Russell Memorial - Kipling and Lakeshore 
Friday June 10, 1-4 pm 

Sherwood Park - Eglinton and Mt. Pleasant 
Saturday June 11, 10am -4 pm 

G Ross Lord - Dufferin and Steeles 
Sunday June 12, 10am -4 pm 

Morningside - Morningside and Ellesmere 
Monday June 13, 1-4 pm 

Commitment from dog owners to try pesticide free lawncare will be documented. The results of this initiative will be reported through the local media. Upon completion of this outreach, ideas will be pursued to further sustain the initiative. 

Strategy 

• Volunteers 
To help get the word out and document the successes of the outreach activities volunteers have committed 3 to 30 hours. Their time will be spent talking with dog owners in the parks about the benefits to dog and human health and the environment of reducing pesticide use on their lawns and gardens through natural gardening methods. Additionally volunteers will provide information about the City of Toronto’s pesticide by-law. 

• Veterinarians 
Veterinarians in the GTA are being approached to have the Healthy Paws flyer in their office or provide their expert opinion by way of testimonial about dog exposure to pesticides. Interested vets will also be encouraged to sign a letter of support for the campaign. 

• Literature 
Both a newly created Healthy Paws flyer and already existing information from the City of Toronto will be available for dog owners during the outreach days. 

• Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) 
Techniques outlined by the principals of Community Based Social Marketing will be used to help achieve bahaviour change among the residents of Toronto. Techniques such as;
Commitment - Asking indiviudals to agree to a small request 
Prompts - Reminders 
Norms - Demonstrating that others in the community are going pesticide free 
will be used during the outreach campaign. More information on CBSM is available on this website www.cbsm.com 

• Key Partners 
-City of Toronto 
The City of Toronto's pesticide by-law went into effect April 1, 2004. The by-law restricts use of pesticides on public and private property. It permits use of certain lower risk pest control products. The by-law also permits use of pesticides to control a pest infestation. The City does not regulate retail sales of pesticides in the City of Toronto and as such retailers are permitted to sell products that consumers should not be using under the by-law. 

Now in the second year of the by-law, Toronto Public Health and other City departments continue to develop public education materials intended for a wide range of audiences. Key messages in the resources include achieving pesticide reductions through sustainable gardening maintenance practices (including integrated plant health care strategies and using alternatives to pesticides) as well as the message that Toronto has a pesticide by-law. 

More informaiton and resources are available from the City of Toronto on their website www.toronto.ca/pesticides 

Results 

(coming at the end of summer 2005) 

Key Contacts 

Healthy Paws Initiative, C2P2 - Kady Cowan 

City of Toronto, Public Health - Rich Whate 

Dog Owners Reduce Pesticide Use to Support the Healthy Paws Initiative

A growing number of people with outdoor pets are concerned about the impact of toxic substances, such as pesticides, on the health of their pets, themselves and the local ecosystem.

Outdoor pets are vulnerable to lawn chemicals because they breathe closer to the ground, are small in size, lick their paws and coat, and are more likely to roll around in, crawl on, or even eat the grass that’s been treated with pesticides.  Pet owners and children may also be exposed to pesticides when they handle their pets.

The City of Toronto is among more than 60 municipalities in Canada that have a pesticide by-law to limit the cosmetic (non-essential) use of residential pesticides. A critical step in ensuring compliance with pesticide by-laws is to educate residents on how to solve their pest problems without using the banned pesticides.

This spring, the Canadian Centre for Pollution Prevention (C2P2) launched the Healthy Paws Initiative, an educational outreach campaign, with the support of the Environmental Protection Office of Toronto Public Health.  Rich Whate, Health Promotion Consultant with the Environmental Protection Office of Toronto Public Health explains, Having community organizations use unique strategies such as the Healthy Paws Initiative helps reach a wide variety of Toronto residents.  Increasing awareness of the Pesticide By-Law and encouraging residents to make changes that will help protect the environment is good for animal and human health.

C2P2 is coordinating outreach efforts at local dog parks in the communities of Etobicoke, Downsview, North York, and Scarborough to target dog owners directly.  Volunteers are encouraging dog owners to reduce pesticide use by informing them about the benefits to dog and human health and the environment of reducing pesticide use on their lawns and gardens, providing natural gardening tips, and offering information about the City of Toronto’s pesticide by-law. 

The outreach efforts were specially designed using community-based social marketing techniques explains Kady Cowan, Coordinator of the Healthy Paws Initiative.  Reflecting on the benefits of this approach, Cowan explains Techniques such as prompts or reminders and making natural gardening activities normal aid in achieving the behavioural changes required to reduce pesticide use, which is good for dog, human and ecosystem health, and supports the Toronto pesticide by-law. 

Many residents are thrilled with the results of natural gardening and are eager to protect their pets’ health. Carol Coiffe, Healthy Community Advisor with the Fairlawn Neighbourhood Centre in Toronto supports the need to pass on this message to neighbours, friends and local veterinarians. I encourage animal lovers to share the information and guidance provided by the Healthy Paws Initiative with others - to sustain the momentum of change. Together we can limit unnecessary exposure to pesticides.

C2P2 is also looking for support from local veterinarians and other professionals working with dogs to help educate pet owners on the health benefits of reducing their pet’s exposure to lawn chemicals.  Opportunities to get involved include:  distributing outreach materials to clients and promoting the messages of the Healthy Paws initiative within client newsletters. 

For more details on this initiative contact Kady Cowan by e-mail at kady@c2p2online.com or toll free at 1-800-667-9790.


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